Going to Omaha for the Books!

We live in a small, beautiful city on the prairie.  Nobody knows it’s here; nobody understands why we live here. It’s not glam, but it’s Paradise in the summer, and  has livable urban neighborhoods near shops, almost no traffic, and everything you need to be a well-adjusted 21st-century American.   A woman who moved here from California observed  in line at Starbucks,  “I can live anywhere there’s a Starbucks and Target!”

But we do lack bookstores, except for B&N, so today we headed to Omaha, the nearest big city, to browse at Jackson Street Booksellers, a huge used bookstore, and The Bookworm.

Jackson Street Booksellers, Omaha

Jackson Street Booksellers, Omaha

First up:  I found an  irresistible Library of America volume with three of William Dean Howells’ novels, The Minister’s Charge, April Hopes, and Annie Kilburn.  Have you heard of these?  We have not, but I love Howells!

Ilka chase new york 22 bought in omahaAnd now for ’50s pop!  I could not resist this cover.  According to Kirkus, Ilka Chase’s 1951 novel New York 22 is “a chaise longue coverage of marital friction, feminine calculation and upper bracket racketing, this should have good rentals on the distaff side; and substantial sales to the gilded glamor fringe.”

There is very little about Chase online.   The daughter of Edna Woolman Chase, the editor of Vogue from 1914-1952, Ilka was a member of the Smart Set and an actress who starred in many Broadway plays, including the original Broadway version of The Women.  Ilka adapted her novel In Bed We Cry, the story of a self-made career woman in the cosmetics business.  And she had  her own  TV show called Fashion Magic!

I’ll be happy if this novel is readable in the style of a trashy pageturner like Faith Baldwin’s Skyscraper or Susann’s  Valley of the Dolls (a truly great trash classic!).  There’s hope:  The characters are drinking cocktails, and the heroine, Georgiana, leaves her husband and daughter  to chase a writer who is 12 years younger than she.

Here’s a quote chosen at random:

Georgiana sat in her office at Tang, her desk spread with manuscripts and correspondence waiting her attention, but she ignored them.  She was engrossed in reading the first review of Reams’s book, The Shadowed Path.  Reams had sailed according to schedule, but Barnstable had published it that week and Georgiana read the clippings with a sense of triumph and a sinking heart.  As she had expected, Reams was accepted into high company.  Thomas Wolfe,Hemingway, Faulkner, in reference and comparison–the great names dotted the columns.

I may save this for Thanksgiving:  I like to read old pop novels while the turkey is roasting.

C by Maurice Baring omahaNext up:  Maurice Baring’s C (1924).  I’ve never heard of it, but I do love a good novel about Edwardian house parties.  Goodreads says, “Baring’s homage to a decadent and carefree Edwardian age depicts a society as yet untainted by the traumas and complexities of twentieth-century living. With wit and subtlety a happy picture is drawn of family life, house parties in the country and a leisured existence clouded only by the rumblings of the Boer War. Against this spectacle Caryl Bramsley (the C of the title) is presented – a young man of terrific promise but scant achievement, whose tragic-comic tale offsets the privileged milieu.”

Last but not least,  Tama Janowitz’s A Certain Age.  I loved Janowitz’s new memoir, Scream (which I wrote about here), and look forward to reading this  modern retelling of Edith Wharton’s The Age of Innocence.

janowitz a certain age 1769009474

I bought nothing at the Bookworm today, because I had exceeded my limit at Jackson Street Booksellers.

And, by the way, here’s the sky  snapped from the car as we tooled down the highway:

Western Iowa off the highway

10 thoughts on “Going to Omaha for the Books!

  1. Very nice finds, none of which I’ve heard of. But the joy of random browsing and finds In a bookshop is so much better than simply ordering a title online – that’s why a bookshop is always better. Love the cover of the Chase book (and also the beautiful sky in your part of the world)

  2. Lovely posting. I too cannot think of a better travel trip to make. Jim and I used to do this regularly — we’d drive to Maryland or “far” into “deepest remote” DC 🙂

    April Hopes is a good novel. It’s about one of these summer journeys to Europe, very Henry James except blessedly the usual crucial information you are never told is there. I remember a mother and daughter pair (like Trollope).

    I like that last photo.

    • Oh, I’ll look forward to April Hopes. I was so happy to find this LOA volume (only $10). The store seems to be doing very well: it’s our favorite.

  3. Have I recommended Joyce Elbert’s The Crazy Ladies (early 70s) as a popular book in the same family as Valley of the Dolls? i read it in high school and it might be fun to have as backup if you run out of reading material if the turkey is uncooperative. The Crazy Ladies was popular at my school, we passed it around furtively during class breaks. I recall it was a good enough read, not sure what i would think of it today, i hope i would find it amusing. That big sky and puffy clouds is gorgeous! We have way too much humidity down here!

    • Oh my goodness I’ve never heard of Joyce Elbert! I’ll have to look into her book. Nice title! Yes, it was a perfect day, actually cool, though we’ve had a lot of humidity this summer. It must be hotter where you live!

  4. If I knew that the Janowitz novel was a Wharton-retelling, I’d forgotten. Thanks for adding another to my TBR list, Kat!

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